Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine: Arms, Crest and Badge. Garter, Clarenceux and Norroy and Ulster Kings of Arms. 30/1/2007. The Patent was presented to the Faculty by Norroy and Ulster King of Arms on 20 April 2007.

The Arms are blazoned Gules a Pall reversed Ermine between three Swords points upwards Argent hilts pommels quillons and each entwined by a Serpent Or. The Crest is On a Wreath Argent and Gules Issuing from a Circlet of alternate Fleurs de lys and Pomegranates a Serpent torqued erect Or holding in the mouth a Pair of Scales Or the dishes Argent. The Badge (not shown) is A Wheel Or surmounted by three Swords in pall reversed points outwards Argent hilts pommels quillons and each entwined by a Serpent Or.

College reference: Grants 172/139.

Welcome to the thirteenth edition of the College of Arms Newsletter.

The Earl Marshal's Court

The hall of the College of Arms dates from 1671-1673, being one of the first parts of the building to be erected after the destruction of Derby House in the Fire of London. It was used as a library until at least 1699. It was fitted up after 1707 as a Court Room for the Court of Chivalry or Earl Marshal's Court, with panelling, rails and throne.

Recent inspections of the paintwork, plaster and panelling of the Earl Marshal's Court revealed that the panels on the walls were separating from their frames; that a number of cracks had opened in the plaster of both walls and ceiling; and that the paintwork in general was in need of renewal. Work on the Court was undertaken by the specialist restoration firm of T Greening (Doncaster) Ltd. between October and December 2006.

The restoration work was funded by a number of very generous donations and grants following an appeal, together with contributions from the College of Arms Trust and the College itself.

Welcome to the twelfth edition of the College of Arms Newsletter, which is produced every three months and sent automatically and free to those who subscribe by entering their name and e-mail address in our mailing list. Other benefits for those who submit their names in this way include advance notice of College of Arms events, relevant publications, and media appearances. If you wish to remove your name from this list, to send the newsletter on to someone else, or send a genealogical or heraldic enquiry to the College, please make use of the links listed at the top of this page.

011-01High Court of Chivalry: on 7 December the website of the records of the High Court of Chivalry in the years 1634-40 went live at www.court-of-chivalry.bham.ac.uk. This period was the busiest in the court's history, largely due to the popularity of actions for scandalous words likely to provoke a duel, essentially a civilian species of action for defamation brought by members of the gentry or nobility. Many of the cases relate to questions of status, including disputes over social rank and the right to arms. The case papers and the stories behind them constitute a rich source for the study of the language of status, of the long drawn-out attempt to prevent duelling, of the relationship between different branches of the law, and of early modern social, sexual and scatological insult. They also offer insights into gender relations, processes of litigation and dispute settlement, as well as a wealth of biographical detail on plaintiffs, defendants and witnesses. They have considerable genealogical potential.

Left: a statement by a notary public from the bundles of court records at the College of Arms, with the notary's mark in the form of a portrait.

The website, prepared by a Centre for Reformation and Early Modern Studies project on the Court, publishes detailed abstracts, in a fully searchable form, of all surviving material from the 738 cases of which we have information, of over 1000 cases which went before the court in the period in question; the material is held largely at the College of Arms, with some additional records at Arundel Castle. The online version of the project also represents the first stage in a College of Arms plan to create a website for the High Court of Chivalry, exploring the history of the court and introducing the legal and heraldic questions connected with it and the Law of Arms.

Work on this project has been carried out by Dr Richard Cust and Dr Andrew Hopper of the Centre for Reformation and Earl Modern Studies, University of Birmingham, with funding provided by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. A companion volume to this web site, containing an account of the court's history and summaries of the cases for this period will be published by the Harleian Society in spring 2007 as Cases in the High Court of Chivalry, 1634-1640 edited by R. P. Cust and A. J. Hopper.
• • •

Welcome to the eleventh edition of the College of Arms Newsletter, which is produced every three months and sent automatically and free to those who subscribe by entering their name and e-mail address in our mailing list. Other benefits for those who submit their names in this way include advance notice of College of Arms events, relevant publications, and media appearances. If you wish to remove your name from this list, to send the newsletter on to someone else, or send a genealogical or heraldic enquiry to the College, please make use of the links listed at the top of this page.

By decision of the College of Arms all proceeds arising from the sale of The Armorial of Haiti will be donated to the international effort for the relief of Haiti
after the calamitous earthquake of 12 January 2010.

The College of Arms Newsletter is produced every three months and sent automatically and free to those who subscribe. Other benefits for those who submit their names in this way include advance notice of College of Arms events, relevant publications, and media appearances.

We use session cookies to improve your experience with our website. If you continue using our website without changing your settings, or accept, we'll assume you are happy to receive the cookies set. To find out more about how we use cookies, please read our privacy policy.
To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

I accept cookies from this site.